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Video instructions and help with filling out and completing leave form army

Instructions and Help about leave form army

Everybody needs a little bit of time to unwind and relax take a little vacation even soldiers in the United States Army so in this video we're talking about how time off and vacation time works for soldiers in the US Army what's up friends I am US Army veteran Christopher Kaos and this is the time of year when a lot of soldiers are taking some time off to go see family for the holidays so you may be curious how does that work for soldiers maybe you are potentially wanting to go to the army or you're just curious about the topic and that's we're to talk about so first we'll start off from the very basic level which is weekend's now for the most part soldiers usually get weekends off there are some exceptions to that though however so for instance if soldiers are doing training may be on the field maybe they have duty where they have to sit at a desk for 24 hours or even certain jobs they're not going to necessarily get weekends off there are some jobs in the army they don't get every weekend off for example military police you know they have to patrol the streets you have cooks that work in the DFAC they still have to cook food even on the weekends holidays and then probably a few other ones as well but for the most part most soldiers anyways get weekends off unless they fall into that category for the most part work happens from Monday through Friday and then Saturday and Sunday is usually some off time and then additionally if there happens to be a holiday then you also get that as well so soldiers will get holidays and then sometimes along with holidays units will throw in what is called training holidays or Danza days where maybe if that holiday happens to fall on a Monday they might also get that Friday prior off to give them a four-day weekend that's not always the case just often there will be units that will do stuff like that that essentially just turns a three-day weekend into a four-day weekend but there are other stuff to go count along with that if you have like a three-day weekend or a four-day weekend usually leadership wants to do an inspection on like your vehicle to make sure it works okay and you have some kind of plan for the weekend just a safety briefing stuff and all that usually will be taken care of prior to that three-day weekend or four-day weekend you don't typically have that just over a normal weekend but some units may be really strict and they do do that kind of stuff but it's not very common now if it's a railer weekend three-day weekend or a four-day weekend still can't really do whatever the heck you want to do you are still kind of confined to mileage radius so for.

FAQ

Does a girlfriend have to fill out a leave request form for a US Army Soldier in Special Operations in Africa?
Let me guess, you've been contacted via email by somebody you’ve never met. they've told you a story about being a deployed soldier. At some stage in the dialogue they’ve told you about some kind of emotional drama, sick relative/kid etc. They tell you that because they are in a dangerous part of the world with no facilities they need you to fill in a leave application for them. Some part of this process will inevitably involve you having to pay some money on their behalf. The money will need to be paid via ‘Western Union’. Since you havent had much involvement with the military in the past you dont understand and are tempted to help out this poor soldier. they promise to pay you back once they get back from war.if this sounds familiar you are being scammed. There is no soldier just an online criminal trying to steal your money. If you send any money via Western Union it is gone, straight into the pockets of the scammer. you cant get it back, it is not traceable, this is why scammers love Western Union. They aernt going to pay you back, once they have your money you will only hear from them again if they think they can double down and squeeze more money out of you.Leave applications need to be completed by soldiers themselves. They are normally approved by their unit chain of command. If there is a problem the soldier’s commander will summon them internally to resolve the issue. This is all part of the fun of being a unit commander!! If the leave is not urgent they will wait for a convenient time during a rotation etc to work out the problems, if the leave is urgent (dying parent/spouse/kid etc) they will literally get that soldier out of an operational area ASAP. Operational requirements come first but it would need to be something unthinkable to prevent the Army giving immediate emergency leave to somebody to visit their dying kid in hospital etc.The process used by the scammers is known as ‘Advance fee fraud‡ and if you want to read about the funny things people do to scam the scammers have a read over on The largest scambaiting community on the planet!
How can I get a leave form for my fiance in the US Army?
A DA-31 can only be filled out and submitted by the person asking for leave. Also, a fiance is treated no different than an acquaintance unless and until you are married.Many questions like this are asked to make someone feel better about wiring money to a "US Servicemember" who asked for money.I've been in the military for over 23 years. I've never heard of another real servicemember who has asked random people on the internet for money, and certainly not for any legitimate reason.The reason? We're trained per Federal Regulations that Govern Gifts to Service Members, “DoD personnel may not solicit gifts, even for others, unless the solicitation is part of an official fundraising program, such as the Combined Federal Campaign.”Here's how you know that someone posing as a servicemember is scamming you:You've never physically met him or her, and,They ask for money or gift cardsHere are my tips regarding anyone you've never physically met:If you're speaking to someone in another country or other place far away by email or phone and have never physically met them, I recommend you don't even refer to them as someone you truly know, and you definitely shouldn't call them your love interest/girlfriend/boyfriend/fiancé.Remember that anyone with access to email and who needs money can use that same email to contact real family and friends they actually know and have met in person.Regarding servicemembers:Unless you're personally traveling to meet a servicemember, you won't need to pay for anything the servicemember needs or does. And I do mean anything. They can be thrown in jail by the military and you still won't need to pay anything.The military branches have relief funds to help young, poor military members who need baby supplies, travel for emergencies, prphone cards, fix their cars, etc. If they have a close family member die when on deployment, even malingerers get personal help from the command to take care of what they need.Given the prevalence of military email scams, it's a 99.99% chance that anyone emailing you claiming to be a servicemember and asking for money isn't in the military at all.
Do military members have to pay any fee for leave or fiancee forms?
NOOOOOOO. You are talking to a military romance scammer. I received an email from the US Army that directly answers your question that is pasted below please keep reading.I believe you are the victim of a military Romance Scam whereas the person you are talking to is a foreign national posing as an American Soldier claiming to be stationed overseas on a peacekeeping mission. That's the key to the scam they always claim to be on a peacekeeping mission.Part of their scam is saying that they have no access to their money that their mission is highly dangerous.If your boyfriend girlfriend/future husband/wife is asking you to do the following or has exhibited this behavior, it is a most likely a scam:Moves to private messaging site immediately after meeting you on Facebook or SnapChat or Instagram or some dating or social media site. Often times they delete the site you met them on right after they asked you to move to a more private messaging siteProfesses love to you very quickly & seems to quote poems and song lyrics along with using their own sort of broken language, as they profess their love and devotion quickly. They also showed concern for your health and love for your family.Promises marriage as soon as he/she gets to state for leave that they asked you to pay for.They Requests money (wire transfers) and Amazon, iTune ,Verizon, etc gift cards, for medicine, religious practices, and leaves to come home, internet access, complete job assignments, help sick friend, get him out of trouble, or anything that sounds fishy.The military does prall the soldier needs including food medical Care and transportation for leave. Trust me, I lived it, you are probably being scammed. I am just trying to show you examples that you are most likely being connned.Below is an email response I received after I sent an inquiry to the US government when I discovered I was scammed. I received this wonderful response back with lots of useful links on how to find and report your scammer. And how to learn more about Romance Scams.Right now you can also copy the picture he gave you and do a google image search and you will hopefully see the pictures of the real person he is impersonating. this doesn't always work and take some digging. if you find the real person you can direct message them and alert them that their image is being used for scamming.Good Luck to you and I'm sorry this may be happening to you. please continue reading the government response I received below it's very informative.   You have contacted an email that is monitored by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. Unfortunately, this is a common concern. We assure you there is never any reason to send money to anyone claiming to be a Soldier online. If you have only spoken with this person online, it is likely they are not a U.S. Soldier at all. If this is a suspected imposter social media profile, we urge you to report it to that platform as soon as possible. Please continue reading for more resources and answers to other frequently asked questions:  How to report an imposter Facebook profile: Caution-https://www.facebook.com/help/16... Caution-https://www.facebook.com/help/16...   Answers to frequently asked questions:  - Soldiers and their loved ones are not charged money so that the Soldier can go on leave.  - Soldiers are not charged money for secure communications or leave.  - Soldiers do not need permission to get married.  - Soldiers emails are in this format: john.doe.mil@mail.mil Caution-mailto: john.doe.mil@mail.mil anything ending in .us or .com is not an official email account.  - Soldiers have medical insurance, which pays for their medical costs when treated at civilian health care facilities worldwide ‡ family and friends do not need to pay their medical expenses.  - Military aircraft are not used to transport Privately Owned Vehicles.  - Army financial offices are not used to help Soldiers buy or sell items of any kind.  - Soldiers deployed to Combat Zones do not need to solicit money from the public to feed or house themselves or their troops.  - Deployed Soldiers do not find large unclaimed sums of money and need your help to get that money out of the country.  Anyone who tells you one of the above-listed conditions/circumstances is true is likely posing as a Soldier and trying to steal money from you.  We would urge you to immediately cease all contact with this individual.  For more information on avoiding online scams and to report this crime, please see the following sites and articles:   This article may help clarify some of the tricks social media scammers try to use to take advantage of people: Caution-https://www.army.mil/article/61432/ Caution-https://www.army.mil/article/61432/   CID advises vigilance against 'romance scams,' scammers impersonating Soldiers  Caution-https://www.army.mil/article/180749 Caution-https://www.army.mil/article/180749   FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center: Caution-http://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx Caution-http://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx   U.S. Army investigators warn public against romance scams: Caution-https://www.army.mil/article/130... Caution-https://www.army.mil/article/130...   DOD warns troops, families to be cybercrime smart -Caution-http://www.army.mil/article/1450... Caution-http://www.army.mil/article/1450...   Use caution with social networking  Caution-https://www.army.mil/article/146... Caution-https://www.army.mil/article/146...    Please see our frequently asked questions section under scams and legal issues. Caution-http://www.army.mil/faq/ Caution-http://www.army.mil/faq/ or visit Caution-http://www.cid.army.mil/ Caution-http://www.cid.army.mil/ .  The challenge with most scams is determining if an individual is a legitimate member of the US Army. Based on the Privacy Act of 1974, we cannot prthis information. If concerned about a scam you may contact the Better Business Bureau (if it involves a solicitation for money), or local law enforcement. If you're involved in a Facebook or dating site scam, you are free to contact us direct, (571) 305-4056.   If you have a social security number, you can find information about Soldiers online at Caution-https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/appj/sc... Caution-https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/appj/sc... . While this is a free search, it does not help you locate a retiree, but it can tell you if the Soldier is active duty or not.  If more information is needed such as current duty station or location, you can contact the Commander Soldier's Records Data Center (SRDC) by phone or mail and they will help you locate individuals on active duty only, not retirees. There is a fee of $3.50 for businesses to use this service. The check or money order must be made out to the U.S. Treasury. It is not refundable. The address is:  Commander Soldier's Records Data Center (SRDC) 8899 East 56th Street Indianapolis, IN 46249-5301 Phone: 1-866-771-6357  In addition, it is not possible to remove social networking site profiles without legitimate proof of identity theft or a scam. If you suspect fraud on this site, take a screenshot of any advances for money or impersonations and report the account on the social networking platform immediately.  Please submit all information you have on this incident to Caution-www.ic3.gov Caution-http://www.ic3.gov (FBI website, Internet Criminal Complaint Center), immediately stop contact with the scammer (you are potentially providing them more information which can be used to scam you), and learn how to protect yourself against these scams at Caution-http://www.ftc.gov Caution-http://www.ftc.gov (Federal Trade Commission's website)
Can a girlfriend request a leave pass for an army soldier deployed in Afghanistan?
You submit a request on a leave form thru your chain of command.Too easy?YOU ARE BEING SCAMMED.DONT SEND ANY MONEYLet me guess.You fell in love with someone who says they are in the military and stationed over seas.You text them all the time. Trade photos.They can't video chat…. security reasons.They can't send you their email address…must end in .mil and nothing else, security reasons you knowMaybe they can't chat real time either…that pesky security again.They need money…can't access their bank account…security again, or because they are overseas.They are not now and have never been in the military and they have never been in the US.YOU ARE BEING SCAMMEDDON'T SEND MONEY TO THEM IN ANY FORM, NO ITUNES OR GREEN DOT OR WALMART CARDN OR WESTERN UNION OR MONEYGRAM.YOU ARE BEING SCAMMED.YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED
If in the US Army do you have to pay for a leave certificate?
Only a military member can apply for their own leave - no one else can apply in their stead.If a military member is requiring payment from another member in order to process paperwork of any kind, you should find out their name and report them to their service's Inspector General for bribery.When deployed, members rarely get leave. For example, when my battalion was stationed in Afghanistan and Africa, we did not allow members to take leave or fly back to America unless they were separating from the military or a parent, spouse, child, or siblings died. If they did get to return, the government covered the cost of travel back to home station.Many questions like this are asked to make someone feel better about wiring money to a "US Servicemember" who asked for money.I've been in the military for over 23 years. I've never heard of another real servicemember who has asked random people on the internet for money, and certainly not for any legitimate reason.The reason? We're trained per Federal Regulations that Govern Gifts to Service Members, “DoD personnel may not solicit gifts, even for others, unless the solicitation is part of an official fundraising program, such as the Combined Federal Campaign.”Here's how you know that someone posing as a servicemember is scamming you:You've never physically met him or her, and,They ask for money or gift cardsHere are my tips regarding anyone you've never physically met:If you're speaking to someone in another country or other place far away by email or phone and have never physically met them, I recommend you don't even refer to them as someone you truly know, and you definitely shouldn't call them your love interest/girlfriend/boyfriend/fiancé.Remember that anyone with access to email and who needs money can use that same email to contact real family and friends they actually know and have met in person.Regarding servicemembers:Unless you're personally traveling to meet a servicemember, you won't need to pay for anything the servicemember needs or does. And I do mean anything. They can be thrown in jail by the military and you still won't need to pay anything.The military branches have relief funds to help young, poor military members who need baby supplies, travel for emergencies, prphone cards, fix their cars, etc. If they have a close family member die when on deployment, even malingerers get personal help from the command to take care of what they need.Given the prevalence of military email scams, it's a 99.99% chance that anyone emailing you claiming to be a servicemember and asking for money isn't in the military at all.
What is it like to be a geek in a prison?
I'm a hacker who served 4.5 months of a 9 month sentence 5 years ago. I was in two jails in that time, spending the majority of the time in the second, lower security place. The experience totally changed me, but in a positive way.First of all, I actually had a lot of fun in jail. My education made certain aspects of the prison system very easy for me to navigate, such as legal documentation and debating with guards. My ability to mend broken electronics very quickly became known. These things made me feel very safe, since people were actively protecting me. It also made me feel quite important in the community.It started when someone came to me and asked what I knew about mending mobile phones. In UK jails, many people have mobiles, usually obtained by over-the-fence smuggling. Pay-as-you-go credit vouchers are a major form of currency. This guy was very important on the wing - he had a crew of other guys who walked around with him and people often came to pay him. I said I knew enough about phones, and what did he want? He explained that someone had owed him money but couldn't pay. He'd taken the guy's phone as payment, but the phone was pin-locked and he couldn't get in. The phone was an old Samsung, one which I knew (having previously owned one) didn't impose any limit on the number of pin attempts. So I told the guy: yeah, I know a few tricks. But I need to get my tools out so I'll do it overnight. (Note: I didn't have any tools). The guy left me with the phone overnight, and I sat up through the night to try all 10,000 possible 4-digit combinations. Thankfully, the correct code turned up in the mid 2000s. So the next day this guy turned up and was amazed that I had figured out the code. He went round telling everyone that I was some tech wizard and that people should always come to me with their problems. In return for the job he arranged for me to have a Playstation 2 in my cell for two weeks, and to get access to a phone whenever I wanted. For the rest of my time, people would bring me trivially broken electronics and I would retire for the evening to make it out like I was doing something difficult, then return the fixed item the next day. It massively increased my quality of life in there.Secondly, it opened my eyes to how people less fortunate than me live their lives, and how terrible the prison system is for most people. Many, many people in jail were severely mentally ill. There was no support for them. Some were killed in jail, either by inmates or staff, because they flipped out and people got scared. Another large group of people were hopelessly addicted to very harmful drugs. People who exploited this group were the most powerful - they would have drugs smuggled in, then build an army of addicts who would do their bidding to get the next fix. It was a really explosive situation. Almost every act of violence was drug debt related. Immigrants were completely screwed in jail, because there was no way for them to navigate the bureaucracy. I helped several people avoid deportation, including one cell-mate who had a hit contract out on him in Jamaica because he defended his business when yardies tried to extort him. He couldn't read or write, so he couldn't fill out the asylum application. His patois was so strong that his lawyer couldn't really understand what he said, and the border agency was going to send him back to Jamaica to be killed. I wrote letters to the border agency, the prison governor and the home secretary and he was granted asylum and an interpreter was arranged so that his legal visits would be more productive. Hundreds of others in similar situations go without that help every year.Thirdly, I saw some horrible things. For example: 'syruping' - when someone mixes sugar into a bucket of boiling water and dumps it on someone's face. The dissolved sugar makes the boiling water cling to the skin longer, and the skin peels off leaving the raw flesh exposed. I also saw someone held down by four guys, who performed anal surgery on him with a sharpened spoon to extract drugs he was hiding. He later maimed all four of his assailants, stabbing them in the neck with a pen (saw that too). Another was a guy who was clearly paranoid schizophrenic. His cell was opposite mine. He started screaming one night and barricaded himself in. He then stripped off and covered himself with baby oil, and started setting fire to his cell. The guards came in riot gear to tackle him, but he was so slippery it was like trying to catch an eel. He gave them the run around for quite a while before they eventually held him down and injected him* and he was carried away screaming. He died in hospital.Fourthly, I felt so ashamed of myself that I changed my life forever. I was a middle class white kid with a great education who got obsessed with hacking and document security as a teenager and went down for figuring out how to replicate the driving license, thus throwing away many of the advantages that luck, society and my parents had given me. Everyone else in there had no such advantages. Most of them were born to a life where poverty, drugs, violence and lack of education all being concentrated in their environment led to them being systematically channeled into prison. I was there essentially through misplaced intellectual curiosity, while others were there because their lives were so bad out of jail that crime was actually a rational survival choice. Society failed them, while it tried to hold me up with both hands. I was, and am, disgusted with myself. Upon leaving jail I learned programming, worked freelance to pay for my tuition while I got a degree, got a PhD position, and am now working towards spending my life using my skills as efficiently as I can to improve the lives of as many people as possible. If I ever have a lazy moment, I just have to cast my mind back to prison, and the disgust with myself rises up again, and I launch myself back into work with an energy I never knew I had before prison.Finally, I would say that my criminal record has not held me back. I no longer have to legally disclose it**, but when I did I always did so with a letter explaining some of the circumstances and how deeply it had affected my life. I had several positive comments about my disclosure, and I have never been turned down for a job I've applied for. It doesn't have to hold you back - your attitude has to convince a potential employer that your background makes you a great candidate, not a worse one.*This has been corrected: In my haste to write the post I previously wrote that a dart was used, when in fact it was a needle. Thanks to Marty Bee for pointing out that this was not likely.**For those who are curious, a conviction becomes 'spent' in the UK after a certain time. The times were recently reduced in a little publicised law (Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012), so my conviction was 'spent' after 48 months.
How do I apply for a vacation leave in the US Army?
How do I apply for a vacation leave in the US Army?I asked my friend in the army. He suggested the following:Firstly, check the policy and what form you need to apply for your vacation leave, and how much time in advance you need to submit it.It can help to get approval for your request, f you before you start to write the leave for vacation letter, check with your fellow soldiers who will be affected by your absence, for their plans and see if they can help you taking care of your tasks for the time you are not available. Make sure that you also notify those who may be inconvenienced, like partners or customers.The objective of writing this letter is to request a period of leave for a temporary or permanent leave. It will mainly depend on the reason you apply for leave, whether or not you want to use a formal intonation.Make sure you request is complete with your dates of vacation and mention specifically it’s for vacation purpose.Confirm if HR and your commander received (and read) it.Return back to your position in time, if you want to be sure to avoid future problems…Check out an example soldier vacation leave request letter:The source with soldier vacation leave template: Soldier vacation leave letter template
What is the process for a Leave Request from the US Army?
In the US Army, leave is requested on a DA-31 form, often called a leave request. This is routed through the chain of command for approval. The level of approval required depends on the position or seniority of the specific member.If a military member is requiring payment from another member in order to process paperwork of any kind, you should find out their name and report them to their service's Inspector General for bribery. When taking leave at home station, it shouldn't take more than a week for a DA 31 to be processed under normal circumstances.When deployed, members rarely get leave. For example, when my battalion was stationed in Afghanistan and Africa, we did not allow members to take leave or fly back to America unless they were separating from the military or a parent, spouse, child, or siblings died. If they did get to return, the government covered the cost of travel back to home station. There is no such thing as unofficial leave, and there's no such thing as liberty when in a field deployment site.Many questions like this are asked to make someone feel better about wiring money to a "US Servicemember" who asked for money.I've been in the military for over 23 years. I've never heard of another real servicemember who has asked random people on the internet for money, and certainly not for any legitimate reason.The reason? We're trained per Federal Regulations that Govern Gifts to Service Members, “DoD personnel may not solicit gifts, even for others, unless the solicitation is part of an official fundraising program, such as the Combined Federal Campaign.”Here's how you know that someone posing as a servicemember is scamming you:You've never physically met him or her, and,They ask for money or gift cardsHere are my tips regarding anyone you've never physically met:If you're speaking to someone in another country or other place far away by email or phone and have never physically met them, I recommend you don't even refer to them as someone you truly know, and you definitely shouldn't call them your love interest/girlfriend/boyfriend/fiancé.Remember that anyone with access to email and who needs money can use that same email to contact real family and friends they actually know and have met in person.Regarding servicemembers:Unless you're personally traveling to meet a servicemember, you won't need to pay for anything the servicemember needs or does. And I do mean anything. They can be thrown in jail by the military and you still won't need to pay anything.The military branches have relief funds to help young, poor military members who need baby supplies, travel for emergencies, prphone cards, fix their cars, etc. If they have a close family member die when on deployment, even malingerers get personal help from the command to take care of what they need.Given the prevalence of military email scams, it's a 99.99% chance that anyone emailing you claiming to be a servicemember and asking for money isn't in the military at all.